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Enoploteuthis anapsis Roper 1964

Kotaro Tsuchiya
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Containing group: Enoploteuthis

Introduction

Enoploteuthis anapsis, a relatively small species for the genus, attains 70mm DML. This species is widely distributed in the tropical to warm temperate Atlantic. This is the only species in the genus that is restricted to the Atlantic Ocean. This species is similar to E. jonesi and E. higginsi from the Pacific Ocean in the general photophore patterns.

Characteristics

  1. Tentacle
    1. Tentacle long, with distinct club.
    2. Carpal cluster oval.
    3. Two rows of different-sized hooks on manus.
    4. Four rows of suckers on dactylus.
    5. Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
      Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window

      Figure. Oral view of the tentacle club of E. anapsis. Drawing from Roper (1964)

  2. Hectocotylus
    1. Hectocotylus with two flaps; large truncate proximal flap and short semicircular distal one.
    2. Modified portion with armature.
    3. Distal suckers lost in fully mature male.
    4. Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
      Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window

      Figure. Oral-dorsal view of the hectocotylus of E. anapsis, from Northwest Atlantic. Drawing from Tsuchiya (2000)

  3. Integumental Photophores
    1. Ventral mantle with six longitudinal stripes of integumental organs anteriorly; stripes diffuse posteriorly.
    2. Ventral head with two ring-like patterns of integumental photophores.
    3. Ventral side of arm III with a series of organs to the middle of arm length along the base of aboral keel.
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      Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window

      Figure. E. anapsis. Ventral view showing arrangement of photophores. Photograph by M. Vecchione

       

Distribution

Vertical distribution

Specimens between 15-79mm DML were collected at 0-130m at night (Roper, 1966).

Geographical distribution

This species is the only species in the genus that is endemic species to the Atlantic. It is widely distributed the tropical to warm temperate waters between 40° N - 40° S (Roper, 1966).

References

Roper, C.F.E., 1964. Enoploteuthis anapsis, a new species of enoploteuthid squid (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida) from the Atlantic Ocean. Bulletin of Marine Science of Gulf and Caribbean, 14:140-148.

Roper, C.F.E., 1966. A study of the genus Enoploteuthis (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida) in the Atlantic Ocean with a description of the type species, E. leptura (Leach, 1817). Dana Report, 66:1-46.

Tsuchiya, K. 2000. Illustrated book of the Enoploteuthidae. In: Okutani T., ed. True face of Watasenia scintillans. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, p 196269. (in Japanese)

Title Illustrations
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Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
Scientific Name Enoploteuthis anapsis
Location Caribbean Sea
Reference Roper, C.F.E., 1964. Enoploteuthis anapsis, a new species of enoploteuthid squid (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida) from the Atlantic Ocean. Bulletin of Marine Science of Gulf and Caribbean, 14:140-148. P.142, Fig. 1.
Creator C.F.E. Roper
Sex Female
View Ventral
Size 63 mm ML
Type Holotype
Copyright © Bulletin of Marine Science
About This Page
Drawings from Roper (1964) printed with the Permission of the Bulletin of Marine Science.


Tokyo University of Fisheries, Tokyo, Japan

All Rights Reserved.

Citing this page:

Tsuchiya, Kotaro. 2018. Enoploteuthis anapsis Roper 1964. Version 29 March 2018 (under construction). http://tolweb.org/Enoploteuthis_anapsis/19705/2018.03.29 in The Tree of Life Web Project, http://tolweb.org/

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